Exploring the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of antimicrobial resistance interventions: a comparison of high-income and low-middle-income countries

Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a challenge to modern medicine. Interventions have been applied worldwide to tackle AMR, but these actions are often not reported to peers or published, leading to important knowledge gaps about what actions are being taken. Understanding factors that influence the implementation of AMR interventions and what factors are relevant in low-middle-income countries (LMICs) and high-income countries (HICs) were the key objectives of this exploratory study, with the aim to identifying which priorities these contexts need.

Methods: A questionnaire was used to explore context, characteristics, and success factors or obstacles to intervention success based on participant input. The context was analyzed using the AMR-Intervene framework, and success factors and obstacles to intervention success were identified using thematic analysis.

Results: Of the 77 interventions, 57 were implemented in HICs and 17 in LMICs. Interventions took place in the animal sector, followed by the human sector. Public organizations were mainly responsible for implementation and funding. Nine themes and 32 sub-themes emerged as important for intervention success. The themes most frequently reported were 'behavior', 'capacity and resources', 'planning', and 'information'. Five sub-themes were key in all contexts ('collaboration and coordination', 'implementation', 'assessment', 'governance', and 'awareness'), two were key in LMICs ('funding and finances' and 'surveillance, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and preventive screening'), and five were key in HICs ('mandatory', 'multiple profiles', 'personnel', 'management', and 'design').

Conclusion: LMIC sub-themes showed that funding and surveillance were still key issues for interventions, while important HIC sub-themes were more specific and detailed, including mandatory enforcement, multiple profiles, and personnel needed for good management and good design. While behavior is often underrated when implementing AMR interventions, capacity and resources are usually considered, and LMICs can benefit from sub-themes captured in HICs if tailored to their contexts. The factors identified can improve the design, planning, implementation, and evaluation of interventions.


Read article

Citation: Graells, T., I. A. Lambraki, M. Cousins, A. Leger, P. J. Henriksson, M. Troell, C. A. Carson, E. J. Parmley, S. E. Majowicz, D. Wernli, and P.S. Jørgensen. (2023). Exploring the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of antimicrobial resistance interventions: a comparison of high-income and low-middle-income countries. Frontiers in public health 11:13.

Exploring the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of antimicrobial resistance interventions: a comparison of high-income and low-middle-income countries

Exploring the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of antimicrobial resistance interventions: a comparison of high-income and low-middle-income countries

Exploring the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of antimicrobial resistance interventions: a comparison of high-income and low-middle-income countries

Den här webbplatsen använder cookiesför statistik och användarupplevelse.

gedb använder cookies för att förbättra din användarupplevelse, för att ge underlag till förbättring och vidareutveckling av hemsidan samt för att kunna rikta mer relevanta erbjudanden till dig.

Läs gärna vår personuppgiftspolicy. Om du samtycker till vår användning, välj Tillåt alla. Om du vill ändra ditt val i efterhand hittar du den möjligheten i botten på sidan.

Cookies